Gynecological Care

Recovery Times Vary:

  • First, each person heals differently from one another.
  • Second, is dependent on the surgical procedure chosen.
  • Third, is the reason for your surgery.

If your medical condition or the procedure being performed is more extensive it will require more time for you to recover.

HELPFUL LINKS
General Anesthesia video

Hysterectomy

Hysterectomy is a way of treating problems that affect the uterus. Many conditions can be cured with hysterectomy. Because it is major surgery, you may want to explore other treatment options first. For conditions that have not responded to other treatments, a hysterectomy may be the best choice.

Vaginal Hysterectomy. In a vaginal hysterectomy, the uterus is removed through the vagina. With this type of surgery, you will not have an incision (cut) on your abdomen. Because the incision is inside the vagina, the healing time may be shorter than with abdominal surgery. There may be less pain during recovery. Vaginal hysterectomy causes fewer complications than the other types of hysterectomy and is a very safe way to remove the uterus. It also is associated with a shorter hospital stay and a faster return to normal activities than abdominal hysterectomy.

A vaginal hysterectomy is not always possible. For example, women who have adhesions from previous surgery or who have a very large uterus may not be able to have this type of surgery.

Abdominal Hysterectomy. In an abdominal hysterectomy, the doctor makes an incision through the skin and tissue in the lower abdomen to reach the uterus. The incision may be vertical or horizontal.This type of hysterectomy gives the surgeon a good view of the uterus and other organs during the operation. This procedure may be chosen if you have large tumors or if cancer may be present. Abdominal hysterectomy may require a longer healing time than vaginal or laparoscopic surgery, and it usually requires a longer hospital stay.

Laparoscopic Hysterectomy. In a laparoscopic hysterectomy, a laparoscope is used to guide the surgery. A laparoscope is a thin, lighted tube with a camera that is inserted into the abdomen through a small incision in or around the navel. It allows the surgeon to see the pelvic organs on a screen. Additional small incisions are made in the abdomen for other instruments used in the surgery.

There are three kinds of laparoscopic hysterectomy:

    • Total laparoscopic hysterectomy—A small incision is made in the navel for the laparoscope, and one or more small incisions are made in the abdomen for other instruments. The uterus is detached from inside the body. It then is removed in small pieces through the incisions, or the pieces are passed out of the body through the vagina. If only the uterus is removed and the cervix is left in place, it is called a supracervical laparoscopic hysterectomy.
    • Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH)—A vaginal hysterectomy is done with laparoscopic assistance. For example, the ovaries and fallopian tubes may be detached using laparoscopy, and then the uterus is detached and all of the organs are removed through the vagina.
    • Robot-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy—Some surgeons use a robot attached to the laparoscopic instruments to help perform the surgery. Experience using this technology is limited. More information is needed to see if robotic surgery has added benefits over the other methods.

    Hysteroscopy

    Hysteroscopy is the use of a small camera thru the cervical opening to visualize the lining of the uterus. There are no incisions.  It may help a physician diagnose or treat a uterine problem.
    Most Common Uses for Hysteroscopy:

    • Abnormal Uterine Bleeding
    • Uterine Fibroids and/or Polyps
    • Removal of Adhesions
    • Perform Permanent Birth Control (Essure Procedure)
    • Locate Intrauterine Device (IUD)

    Laparoscopy

    Laparoscopy is a way of doing surgery without making a large incision (cut). A thin, lighted tube—known as the laparoscope—is inserted into the abdomen through a small incision. The laparoscope is a small camera that allows your doctor to see the pelvic organs.

    Most Common Uses for Laparoscopy:

    • Endometriosis
    • Fibroids
    • Ovarian Cysts
    • Ectopic Pregnancy
    • Sterilization
    • Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy (LAVH)
    • Laparoscopic Hysterectomy
    • Uterine Prolapse

    Laparoscopy is a way of doing surgery without making a large incision (cut). A thin, lighted tube—known as the laparoscope—is inserted into the abdomen through a small incision. The laparoscope is a small camera that allows your doctor to see the pelvic organs.

    Most Common Uses for Laparoscopy:

    Endometriosis

    Fibroids

    Ovarian Cysts

    Ectopic Pregnancy

    Sterilization

    Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy (LAVH)

    Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    Uterine Prolapse

    Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    Pelvic Organ Prolapse. The pelvic organs include the vagina, cervix, uterus, bladder, urethra, and the small intestines and rectum. The pelvic organs are held in place by muscles of the pelvic floor. Layers of connective tissue called fascia also provide support.

    Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when the fascia and muscles can no longer support the pelvic organs. These supporting muscles and fascia may become torn or stretched, or they may weaken because of aging. As a result, the organs that they support can drop downward. Sometimes, a bulge can be felt inside the vagina. In severe cases, organs may protrude from the vaginal opening.

    Types of Prolapse

    • Uterine Prolapse – uterus
    • Vaginal Vault – top of the vagina
    • Cystocele – bladder
    • Urethrocele – urethra
    • Enterocele – small intestine
    • Rectocele – rectum

    Intrauterine Device

    Intrauterine Device (IUD) is a type of birth control. It is a small, plastic device that is inserted and left inside the uterus to prevent pregnancy.

    Types of IUD’s

    • Mirena® IUD must be replaced every 5 years.
    • Paragard® IUD must be replaced every 10 years.

    Intrauterine Device (IUD) is a type of birth control. It is a small, plastic device that is inserted and left inside the uterus to prevent pregnancy.

    Types of IUD’s

    Mirena® (link to Mirena website) IUD must be replaced every 5 years.

    Paragard® (link to Paragard website) IUD must be replaced every 10 years.

    Abdominalplasty

    Abdominalplasty or “tummy tuck” is a cosmetic surgery procedure used to make the abdomen more firm. The surgery involves the removal of excess skin and fat from the middle and lower abdomen in order to tighten the muscle and fascia of the abdominal wall. This type of surgery is usually sought by patients with loose tissues after pregnancy or individuals with sagging after major weight loss.

    Abdominalplasty or “tummy tuck” is a cosmetic surgery procedure used to make the abdomen more firm. The surgery involves the removal of excess skin and fat from the middle and lower abdomen in order to tighten the muscle and fascia of the abdominal wall. This type of surgery is usually sought by patients with loose tissues after pregnancy or individuals with sagging after major weight loss.

    Labialplasty

    Labialplasty is a cosmetic surgery procedure of the labia majora and/or the labia minora, which are the external folds of skin surrounding the structures of the vulva. The procedure involves reducing elongated labia. This procedure is performed for a variety of reasons, including correction of damage done to the labia during childbirth, because larger labia can cause pain or discomfort, or for the purposes of cosmetic surgery.